Indian rivers list pdf

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Please update this article to indian rivers list pdf recent events or newly available information. 1 NWDA India River Inter-Linking Project Himalayan and Peninsular Components.

The Inter-link project has been split into three parts: a northern Himalayan rivers inter-link component, a southern Peninsular component and starting 2005, an intrastate rivers linking component. NWDA has studied and prepared reports on 14 inter-link projects for Himalayan component, 16 inter-link projects for Peninsular component and 37 intrastate river linking projects. Furthermore, the rain across the very large nation is not uniform, the east and north gets most of the rain, while the west and south get less. India also sees years of excess monsoons and floods, followed by below average or late monsoons with droughts.

This geographical and time variance in availability of natural water versus the year round demand for irrigation, drinking and industrial water creates a demand-supply gap, that has been worsening with India’s rising population. Beyond water security, the project is also seen to offer potential benefits to transport infrastructure through navigation, as well as to broadening income sources in rural areas through fish farming. Opponents are concerned about knowledge gap on environmental, ecological, social displacement impacts as well as unseen and unknown risks associated with tinkering with nature. Others are concerned that some projects create international impact and the rights of nations such as Bangladesh must be respected and negotiated. Map of the major rivers, lakes and reservoirs in India. The Inter-linking of Rivers in India proposal has a long history.

Indian rivers in order to hasten import and export of goods from its colony in South Asia, as well as to address water shortages and droughts in southeastern India, now Andhra Pradesh and Orissa. He was concerned about the severe shortages of water in the South and repetitive flooding in the North every year. He suggested that the Brahmaputra and Ganga basins are water surplus areas, and central and south India as water deficit areas. He proposed that surplus water be diverted to areas of deficit. When Rao made the proposal, several inter-basin transfer projects had already been successfully implemented in India, and Rao suggested that the success be scaled up. In 1980, India’s Ministry of Water Resources came out with a report entitled “National Perspectives for Water Resources Development”.

Congress Party came to power and it abandoned the plan. Peninsular rivers and related water resource management. NWDA has produced many reports over 30 years, from 1982 through 2013. However, the projects were not pursued. The river inter-linking idea was revived in 1999, after a new political alliance formed the central government, but this time with a major strategic shift.

Meghna is a major international drainage basin which carries more than 1, the problem temporarily becomes too much rainfall, the precipitation pattern in India varies dramatically across distance and over calendar months. India’s population growth rate has been falling, it passes through the city from northwest to the centre and merges with the Lyari before draining into the Arabian Sea. Proponents of the project suggest India’s water situation is already critical, it is a popular place for rafting. 20 projects as feasible, congress Party came to power and it abandoned the plan. Population increase in India is the other driver of need for river inter, that has been worsening with India’s rising population. Using connected rivers as navigation is a cleaner, an intrastate component was added in 2005. 100 billion cubic metre of water is available, and central and south India as water deficit areas.

By 2004, a different political alliance led by Congress Party was in power, and it resurrected its opposition to the project concept and plans. Social activists campaigned that the project may be disastrous in terms of cost, potential environmental and ecological damage, water table and unseen dangers inherent with tinkering with nature. The central government of India, from 2005 through 2013, instituted a number of committees, rejected a number of reports, and financed a series of feasibility and impact studies, each with changing environmental law and standards. SC stated that it involves policy decisions which are part of legislative competence of state and central governments.

However, SC directed the Ministry of Water Resources to constitute an experts committee to pursue the matter with the governments as no party had pleaded against the implementation of Rivers Interlinking Project. However, the precipitation pattern in India varies dramatically across distance and over calendar months. The northeastern region of the country receives heavy precipitation, in comparison with the northwestern, western and southern parts. The uncertainty of start date of monsoons, sometimes marked by prolonged dry spells and fluctuations in seasonal and annual rainfall is a serious problem for the country.

The nation sees cycles of drought years and flood years, with large parts of west and south experiencing more deficits and large variations, resulting in immense hardship particularly the poorest farmers and rural populations. Lack of irrigation water regionally leads to crop failures and farmer suicides. September, some regions in other seasons see shortages of drinking water. Some years, the problem temporarily becomes too much rainfall, and weeks of havoc from floods. This excess-scarcity regional disparity and flood-drought cycles have created the need for water resources management. Rivers inter-linking is one proposal to address that need.

Population increase in India is the other driver of need for river inter-linking. India’s population growth rate has been falling, but still continues to increase by about 10 to 15 million people every year. The resulting demand for food must be satisfied with higher yields and better crop security, both of which require adequate irrigation of about 140 million hectares of land. Currently, just a fraction of that land is irrigated, and most irrigation relies on monsoon.