Soul of my saviour pdf

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Please forward this error screen to 108. Copyright 2010, Standing Committee for the Publication of soul of my saviour pdf Book of Praise of the Canadian Reformed Churches. Not to be confused with solvation. The academic study of salvation is called soteriology.

In religion, salvation is the saving of the soul from sin and its consequences. It may also be called “deliverance” or “redemption” from sin and its effects. God redeeming the people of Israel from their various exiles. Judaism holds that adherents do not need personal salvation as Christians believe.

Jews do not subscribe to the doctrine of original sin. In Judaism, salvation is closely related to the idea of redemption, a saving from the states or circumstances that destroy the value of human existence. God, as the universal spirit and Creator of the World, is the source of all salvation for humanity, provided an individual honours God by observing his precepts. So redemption or salvation depends on the individual. The Jewish concept of Messiah visualises the return of the prophet Elijah as the harbinger of one who will redeem the world from war and suffering, leading mankind to universal brotherhood under the fatherhood of one God.

The Messiah is not considered as a future divine or supernatural being but as a dominating human influence in an age of universal peace, characterised by the spiritual regeneration of humanity. When Jews refer to themselves as the chosen people of God, they do not imply they have been chosen for special favours and privileges but rather they have taken it upon themselves to show to all peoples by precept and example the ethical way of life. When examining Jewish intellectual sources throughout history, there is clearly a spectrum of opinions regarding death versus the afterlife. Possibly an over-simplification, one source says salvation can be achieved in the following manner: Live a holy and righteous life dedicated to Yahweh, the God of Creation. Fast, worship, and celebrate during the appropriate holidays. The salvation of the individual Jew was connected to the salvation of the entire people. This belief stemmed directly from the teachings of the Torah.

In the Torah, God taught his people sanctification of the individual. The concept of salvation was tied to that of restoration for Israel. During the Second Temple Period, the Sadducees, High Priests, denied any particular existence of individuals after death because it wasn’t written in the Torah, while the Pharisees, ancestors of the rabbis, affirmed both bodily resurrection and immortality of the soul, most likely based on the influence of Hellenistic ideas about body and soul and the Pharisaic belief in the Oral Torah. Christianity’s primary premise is that the incarnation and death of Jesus Christ formed the climax of a divine plan for humanity’s salvation. For Christianity, salvation is only possible through Jesus Christ. Christians believe that Jesus’ death on the cross was the once-for-all sacrifice that atoned for the sin of humanity. The Christian religion, though not the exclusive possessor of the idea of redemption, has given to it a special definiteness and a dominant position.

Taken in its widest sense, as deliverance from dangers and ills in general, most religions teach some form of it. It assumes an important position, however, only when the ills in question form part of a great system against which human power is helpless. According to Christian belief, sin as the human predicament is considered to be universal. Apostle Paul declared everyone to be under sin—Jew and Gentile alike. Salvation is made possible by the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus, which in the context of salvation is referred to as the “atonement”.

While some of the differences are as widespread as Christianity itself, the overwhelming majority agrees that salvation is made possible by the work of Jesus Christ, the Son of God, dying on the cross. At the heart of Christian faith is the reality and hope of salvation in Jesus Christ. Christian faith is faith in the God of salvation revealed in Jesus of Nazareth. The Christian tradition has always equated this salvation with the transcendent, eschatological fulfillment of human existence in a life freed from sin, finitude, and mortality and united with the triune God. The Bible presents salvation in the form of a story that describes the outworking of God’s eternal plan to deal with the problem of human sin. The story is set against the background of the history of God’s people and reaches its climax in the person and work of Christ.

The Old Testament part of the story shows that people are sinners by nature, and describes a series of covenants by which God sets people free and makes promises to them. Salvation is believed to be a process that begins when a person first becomes a Christian, continues through that person’s life, and is completed when they stand before Christ in judgment. Christian salvation concepts are varied and complicated by certain theological concepts, traditional beliefs, and dogmas. Scripture is subject to individual and ecclesiastical interpretations. The purpose of salvation is debated, but in general most Christian theologians agree that God devised and implemented his plan of salvation because he loves them and regards human beings as his children. Christians believe that salvation depends on the grace of God. The fact of sin as the human predicament is implied in the mission of Jesus, and it is explicitly affirmed in that connection”.

By its nature, salvation must answer to the plight of humankind as it actually is. In Islam, salvation refers to the eventual entrance to heaven. Islam teaches that people who die disbelieving in the God do not receive salvation. Islam teaches that all who enter into Islam must remain so in order to receive salvation.

Sabians and the Christians,- any who believe in Allah and the Last Day, and work righteousness,- on them shall be no fear, nor shall they grieve. Believing in the attributes of God and attributing them to no other but God. Such attributes include Creation, having no beginning, and having no end. These attributes are what make a God. Islam also teaches 99 names for God, and each of these names defines one attribute. One breaks this principle, for example, by believing in an Idol as an intercessor to God. Directing worship, prayer, or deed to God, and God only.

For example, worshiping an idol or any saint or prophet is also considered Shirk, though prophets and saints may be asked for guidance or to pray for them. Islam also stresses that in order to gain salvation, one must also avoid sinning along with performing good deeds. Islam acknowledges the inclination of humanity towards sin. Therefore, Muslims are constantly commanded to seek God’s forgiveness and repent. Islam teaches that no one can gain salvation simply by virtue of their belief or deeds, instead it is the Mercy of God, which merits them salvation. However, this repentance must not be used to sin any further.