The mindful way through anxiety pdf

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Please forward this error screen to sharedip-107180516. What are the benefits of mindfulness? What are the benefits the mindful way through anxiety pdf mindfulness A wealth of new research has explored this age-old practice.

Here’s a look at its benefits for both clients and psychologists. CE Corner’ “CE Corner” is a quarterly continuing education article offered by the APA Office of CE in Psychology. This feature will provide you with updates on critical developments in psychology, drawn from peer-reviewed literature and written by leading psychology experts. To earn CE credit, after you read this article, purchase the online exam. APA will immediately send you a “Documentation of CE” certificate. The APA Office of CE in Psychology retains responsibility for the program. Identify the definition of mindfulness and what practices develop mindfulness.

Identify at least four benefits of the effect of mindfulness meditation on therapists and therapist trainees. Understand the relationship between therapists’ mindfulness and psychotherapy outcome based on the research to date. Mindfulness has enjoyed a tremendous surge in popularity in the past decade, both in the popular press and in the psychotherapy literature. The practice has moved from a largely obscure Buddhist concept founded about 2,600 years ago to a mainstream psychotherapy construct today.

Advocates of mindfulness would have us believe that virtually every client and therapist would benefit from being more mindful. Among its theorized benefits are self-control, objectivity, affect tolerance, enhanced flexibility, equanimity, improved concentration and mental clarity, emotional intelligence and the ability to relate to others and one’s self with kindness, acceptance and compassion. But is mindfulness as good as advertised? This article offers an overview of the research on mindfulness and discusses its implications for practice, research and training. Empirically supported benefits of mindfulness The term “mindfulness” has been used to refer to a psychological state of awareness, the practices that promote this awareness, a mode of processing information and a character trait. To be consistent with most of the research reviewed in this article, we define mindfulness as a moment-to-moment awareness of one’s experience without judgment. In this sense, mindfulness is a state and not a trait.

Researchers theorize that mindfulness meditation promotes metacognitive awareness, decreases rumination via disengagement from perseverative cognitive activities and enhances attentional capacities through gains in working memory. These cognitive gains, in turn, contribute to effective emotion-regulation strategies. Several studies have shown that mindfulness reduces rumination. In one study, for example, Chambers et al. 20 novice meditators to participate in a 10-day intensive mindfulness meditation retreat. After the retreat, the meditation group had significantly higher self-reported mindfulness and a decreased negative affect compared with a control group. They also experienced fewer depressive symptoms and less rumination.

Many studies show that practicing mindfulness reduces stress. 39 studies that explored the use of mindfulness-based stress reduction and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy. The researchers concluded that mindfulness-based therapy may be useful in altering affective and cognitive processes that underlie multiple clinical issues. Those findings are consistent with evidence that mindfulness meditation increases positive affect and decreases anxiety and negative affect.

Improvements to working memory appear to be another benefit of mindfulness, research finds. A 2010 study by Jha et al. Both military groups were in a highly stressful period before deployment. Another study examined how mindfulness meditation affected participants’ ability to focus attention and suppress distracting information. The researchers compared a group of experienced mindfulness meditators with a control group that had no meditation experience. They found that the meditation group had significantly better performance on all measures of attention and had higher self-reported mindfulness.

Research also supports the notion that mindfulness meditation decreases emotional reactivity. Another line of research suggests that in addition to helping people become less reactive, mindfulness meditation may also give them greater cognitive flexibility. Several studies find that a person’s ability to be mindful can help predict relationship satisfaction — the ability to respond well to relationship stress and the skill in communicating one’s emotions to a partner. Mindfulness has been shown to enhance self-insight, morality, intuition and fear modulation, all functions associated with the brain’s middle prefrontal lobe area.

Several studies suggest that mindfulness promotes empathy. One study, for example, looked at premedical and medical students who participated in an eight-week mindfulness-based stress reduction training. In 2009, Kingsbury investigated the role of self-compassion in relation to mindfulness. Empirical literature demonstrates that including mindfulness interventions in psychotherapy training may help therapists develop skills that make them more effective. The control group evidenced similar gains after exposure to mindfulness-based stress reduction training. These same students had greater attention, self-regulation and immunoreactivity.